The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Advertisement
Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
Nicholas Gutteridge, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024
Advertisement
Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) robs a home run from Florida infielder Cade Kurland (4) in the top of the ninth inning during Texas A&M’s game against Florida at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at Charles Schwab Field in Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, June 15, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
Saves and a robbery
Ian Curtis, Sports Reporter • June 16, 2024

Texas A&M baseball sophomore RF Jace LaViolette is known for his bat — and for good reason. LaViolette ranks sixth in the country in home...

Advertisement
Destination Bryan
Destination Bryan
Cara Hudson, Maroon Life writer • June 17, 2024

Editor's note: This article is sponsored content. All photos were provided by Visit Bryan. For the history buffs, there’s a story to why...

Advertisement
Chris Hemsworth as Dementus in Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga.
Review: ‘Furiosa’ is a must-see
Justin ChenJune 4, 2024

My jaw dropped open in 2016. Rarely in life does that happen, but the viewing experience of “Mad Max: Fury Road" was something to behold....

Destination Bryan
Destination Bryan
June 17, 2024
Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) robs a home run from Florida infielder Cade Kurland (4) in the top of the ninth inning during Texas A&M’s game against Florida at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at Charles Schwab Field in Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, June 15, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
Saves and a robbery
June 16, 2024

Meet an Aggie DREAMer provides platform for discussion

A panel on Wednesday night worked to raise awareness about the undocumented student population at Texas A&M.

The panel, hosted by Council for Minority Student Affairs, was called “Meet an Aggie Dreamer.” After addressing the political, social and humanitarian goals that are part of the organization, the panelists were introduced.

Blanca Leyva, supply chain management junior, is a recipient of DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. DACA was implemented by President Obama’s administration when the DREAM Act failed to pass. The DREAM Act, or Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, was intended to provide a pathway to legal status for children of undocumented immigrants who arrived before the age of 16.

“I interned with one of the biggest accounting firms last summer because of DACA,” Leyva said. “It is what got me interested in doing financial consulting. I want to be able to be able to give money to the community that needs it.”

Cinthia Cruz, business sophomore from Mexico, crossed the border at the age of 10 on her own. Cruz said wants to own her business, but more importantly she wants to be a provider of scholarships for those who want to attend higher education, especially those in low income areas.

Francisco Calderon, biology sophomore and only child that was born outside of the United States, wants to go to medical school after graduating.

“I have always wanted to help people. I want to be in a position where I am able to do so,” Calderon said. “I want to go back to where I come from in Arlington and be able to provide the healthcare that is missing there.”

Alfredo Garcia, a graduate student currently attending Harvard Divinity School for theology that graduated from Texas A&M in 2015, was present from Massachusetts through a teleconference video call. Garcia wants to obtain a PhD after his graduate degree.

“I want to help tutor and mentor kids that want to go to graduate school,” Garcia says.

The panelists testified about the struggles of trying to attend a higher education institution when financial aid is limited. The rest of the panelists agreed about the anxiety they face when having to check the “Not a U.S. citizen” for most scholarships, since many times checking such option can disqualify an applicant.

Jennifer Rivas, psychology freshman from El Salvador and first generation college student, participated in the panel and said she wants to be a physical therapist and to help disabled kids get back into their regular lives.

“You don’t know how hard it is to talk about these things in front of a room full of strangers,” Rivas said. “This is our private life. You grow up with a mentality that you are inferior and that something is wrong with you.”

Garcia said he had to do house painting as he graduated A&M to pay off loans. Garcia was inspired by the Chicano movement and writings by Mexican-American authors.

“Read books that will help you stand up for yourself and your community,” Garcia says. “I experience people looking at me differently because of my ethnicity.”

Asked about what the school and administration can do for the DREAMer community by an audience member, Calderon said having the counselors present the resources at student orientation so parents can feel safe leaving their undocumented children at College Station could be helpful. Cruz agreed.

“The most important part of this process is for us to be seen, to let others know that we exist,” Cruz said.

Rivas said she is frustrated that the system is not being fully educated when it comes to these issues.

“As a DACA student, I am allowed to apply for federal student financial aid,” Rivas says. “I have to sit there and explain to counselors for over 30 minutes that I am able to apply.”

Melanie Garza, president of CMSA, invites the general population to ask questions.

“We want to provide resources that are easily available. Our goal is to have a resource center for undocumented students,” Garza said.

Currently, Deferred Action for Parents of America is under attack as it is being challenged by 27 states in federal court. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, 800,000 have been benefitted from this executive action. Panelists recommended that students concerned with immigration problems as it relates to their educational experiences approach Student Counseling Services, who are able to provide very valuable support and recommend it to Aggies that have similar struggles.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Battalion

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas A&M University - College Station. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Battalion

Comments (0)

All The Battalion Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *