The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Advertisement
Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
Nicholas Gutteridge, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024
Advertisement
Texas A&M infielder Trinity Cannon (6) reacts during Texas A&M’s game against Texas at the Austin Super Regional at Red and Charline McCombs Field in Austin, Texas, on Friday, May 24, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Aggies a win away from Women’s College World Series after 6-5 win over Longhorns
Luke White, Sports Editor • May 24, 2024

Texas A&M softball experienced every inch of the pendulum of emotions in its NCAA Super Regional matchup with Texas on Friday, May 24, but...

Texas A&M utility Gavin Grahovac (9) throws the ball during A&Ms game against Georgia on Friday, April 26, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Southern slugfest
May 23, 2024
Texas A&M pitcher Evan Aschenbeck (53) reacts after throwing the final strike out during Texas A&M’s game against Mississippi State on Saturday, March 23, 2024, at Olsen Field. (Chris Swann/ The Battalion)
Down but not out
May 23, 2024
Advertisement
Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
Advertisement
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Review: ‘Jersey Boys’

%26%238220%3BJersey+Boys%26%238221%3B+takes+the+audience+behind-the-scenes+of+the+lives+of+Frankie+Valli+and+The+Four+Seasons.%0APhoto+provided.
“Jersey Boys” takes the audience behind-the-scenes of the lives of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. Photo provided.

“Jersey Boys” is probably not a film that many undergraduates will enjoy the same way that part of the audience will — who undoubtedly used their discounts as card carrying AARP members to purchase their tickets. Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons dominated the music charts more than 30 years before most of us were born. The biopic directed by Clint Eastwood and based on the Broadway musical of the same name is a decent film that just fails to hit the right note.
The movie opens with the hit “December 1963 (oh what a night)” and follows a young Frankie Valli (John Lloyd Young) as he strives to use the God-given talent that is his falsetto to escape the mob lifestyle.
The movie plays out much like what you would expect if Henry Hill from “Goodfellas” had the voice of an angel and lived Johnny Cash’s life from “Walk the Line,” chronicling the tribulations that come with stage fame and household recognition.
Throughout Valli’s childhood you see many of his friends, including band mate Tommy (Vincent Piazza), bail him out of trouble so that Valli can make something of his life and utilize his talents. The movie uses asides by the band members to narrate the story of the meteoric rise of the quartet. Despite the long first act, there is not much exposition and the film fails to make you feel for Valli or the fast talking Tommy.
The band has its breakout hit after adding on songwriter Bob (Erich Bergen) and composing the song “Sherry.” Transported from the shadows of the streets of New York City to lavish parties and studios, the band members have trouble coping with their new lives, eventually reverting back to their old street habits, which end up being their undoing. The band later breaks up, but not until it makes its mark on rock ‘n’ roll history with a string of hits that come out during the dark days of music after Buddy Holly took a trip to the Iowa countryside.
The set design, musical numbers and costumes are worth noting as they are done well, but they don’t save the film from a boring plot and a two-hour runtime that drones on. Several subplots seem underdeveloped such as the one with Valli’s daughter, which is the closest the audience gets to having an emotional connection with the singer. The execution of the scene ultimately falls flat.
If you are wondering if you will enjoy this movie, ask yourself if you want a nostalgia trip to the days where The Four Seasons dominated the airwaves and you could buy a malted milkshake for a wheat penny, a pack of Viceroy cigarettes for a buffalo nickel and you could borrow your pop’s Plymouth to take your girlfriend down to “make out point.”

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Battalion

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas A&M University - College Station. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Battalion

Comments (0)

All The Battalion Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *