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The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
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Texas A&M pitcher Ryan Prager (18) delivers a pitch during Texas A&M’s game against Kentucky at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at in Omaha, Nebraska on Monday, June 17, 2024. Prager went for 6.2 innings, allowing two hits and zero runs. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
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Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) robs a home run from Florida infielder Cade Kurland (4) in the top of the ninth inning during Texas A&M’s game against Florida at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at Charles Schwab Field in Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, June 15, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
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Texas A&M pitcher Ryan Prager (18) delivers a pitch during Texas A&M’s game against Kentucky at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at in Omaha, Nebraska on Monday, June 17, 2024. Prager went for 6.2 innings, allowing two hits and zero runs. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
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Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) robs a home run from Florida infielder Cade Kurland (4) in the top of the ninth inning during Texas A&M’s game against Florida at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at Charles Schwab Field in Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, June 15, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
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June 16, 2024

2015 declared warmest year in history

Climate+Change
Photo by Graphic by: Sydney Farris
Climate Change

Amid the blizzards and snowstorms freezing the Northeast, it was announced last week that 2015 was the hottest year in recorded history.
According to analysis from the National Centers for Environmental Information, last year saw a global average of temperatures 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit above average. For many regions, including Texas, this also resulted in the wettest year in history.
“When people talk about the possibility of catastrophic climate change they’re not always talking about the changes we’ve seen so far,” said meteorology professor and Texas climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon. “They’re talking about the change that will continue to happen into the future. The younger you are, the bigger the impacts will be in your lifetime.”
The scientific community stands united on this front, Nielsen-Gammon said. Climate change is man-made in origin and is the result of the outpouring of harmful emissions into our atmosphere, he said. Thus, causing a laundry list of climatic consequences which will affect everyone on the planet, said Nielsen-Gammon.
“If we don’t take actions to lesser emissions significantly now, then in 100 years people will be justifiably angry with us,” said meteorology professor Andrew Dessler. “We know that what the trade offs are and the only reason we don’t do anything is because we don’t feel like it, we’re prioritizing our own well being over future generations.”
While lowering one’s emissions can be as simple as people walking more, driving less, or switching out for more energy efficient light bulbs, these are showing only marginal effects.
There is still a lot to do. said Dessler.  He said the most effective way to combat climate change is to go vote for representatives who are passionate about the environment and are determined to fix it.
“What we need is a global change in operations and the only way to do that is have politicians and representatives in power that support reduction of emissions,” Dessler said. “If we want to do something about climate change you need to vote for politicians that will do something.”
Dessler said sea levels will continue to rise, especially in states with large coastlines like Texas.  Precipitation patterns will also change and some areas will be much drier. Even though 2015 brought more rain to Texas than usual, the overall trend will be for Texas to be a drier state over time, said Dessler.  
Climate change should be a real cause for concern for everyone, especially college students and other young people said atmospheric science major Ryan Gonzalez. He said future generations will, without a doubt, be forced to deal with the repercussions of climate change.
“People that plan on having kids and grandkids, and people who have them now, in the future have to put their kids through the difficulties climate change will bring. It should be important to everybody,” Gonzalez said. “Because as humans on this planet we should care about the Earth and protect it.“

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