The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Sophomore LHP Ryan Prager (18) celebrates getting the last strikeout during A&Ms games against Vanderbilt on Friday, April 11, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Ring Day run rule
April 12, 2024
Sophomore LHP Ryan Prager (18) celebrates getting the last strikeout during A&Ms games against Vanderbilt on Friday, April 11, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Ring Day run rule
April 12, 2024
Junior G Wade Taylor IV (4) covers his face after a missed point during Texas A&Ms game against Arkansas on Feb. 20, 2024 at Reed Arena. (Jaime Rowe/The Battalion)
When it rains, it pours
February 24, 2024
Ali Camarillo (2) waiting to see if he got the out during Texas A&Ms game against UIW on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024 at Olsen Field. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
Four for four
February 20, 2024
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Dr. Weston Porter (top left) and researchers from the breast cancer lab. (Photo courtesy of Dr. Weston Porter)
New A&M research initiative provides cutting-edge cancer treatments
J.M. Wise, News Reporter • April 8, 2024

It has been 20 months since Michelle Pozzi, Ph.D, of Texas A&M’s Biochemistry and Biophysics department was diagnosed with cancer. However,...

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Sophomore LHP Ryan Prager (18) celebrates getting the last strikeout during A&Ms games against Vanderbilt on Friday, April 11, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Ring Day run rule
Neil Jhurani, Sports Writer • April 12, 2024

It was Ring Day in Aggieland when No. 3 Texas A&M faced off against No. 6 Vanderbilt on Friday night in the first game of a three-game set. The...

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Students, residents commemorates Eid Al-Fitr
Lasan Ukwatta Liyanage, Life & Arts Writer • April 11, 2024

This year's Eid Al-Fitr celebration, hosted by Texas A&M’s Muslim Student Association, or MSA, drew over 1,500 attendees on Wednesday,...

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Student housing located right outside off campus boundaries on George Bush Drive. 
Guest Commentary: An open letter to City Hall
Ben Crockett, Guest Contributor • April 11, 2024

City Council, As representatives of the Texas Aggie Classes of 2024, 2025, 2026 and 2027, we write to you today to urge a reconsideration...

A clear choice

With a crowded field of candidates jockeying to be student body president, students must sort through a torrent of campaign flyers and similar-sounding platforms before casting their ballots. Luke Cheatham, with his willingness to take action and his constructive advocacy on students’ behalf, stands above the rest.
Student government has often disappointed in its representation of students, and a glance at the other candidates underscores why. The four candidates with extensive experience in student government have said that students voted against fee increases in the February referendum because they were not adequately informed. Students deserve a representative who will keep the student body informed, voice concerns to University leaders and not serve simply as administrators’ liaison to students.
Although lacking in student government experience, Cheatham has a proven leadership record with results. Unity Project’s off-campus bonfire was a controversial undertaking, but Cheatham persevered to put on a successful event focused on safety, inclusion and student participation. Cheatham will bring such energetic leadership to student government.
Cheatham said he will reinvigorate diversity initiatives by ending the separatist attitude that isolates ethnic groups from each other and will renew an aborted attempt by student government to provide a student response to Vision 2020. Cheatham, who will continue living in Walton Hall next year, will be accessible to students in a way other candidates cannot be. Cheatham voted against the fee increases and said that before students are saddled with tuition or fee hikes, the University should first demonstrate that it has improved efficiency and cut expenses.
Student government has little real power, and can only serve as a representative for students, but even this role is often neglected. Cheatham’s advocacy will be a more accurate reflection of students’ views and will, in the long run, be more effective than the lackluster representation of the past. Administrators cannot consider students’ views unless student leaders present it to them.

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