The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Texas A&M utility Gavin Grahovac (9) throws the ball during A&Ms game against Georgia on Friday, April 26, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Southern slugfest
May 23, 2024
Advertisement
Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
Nicholas Gutteridge, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024
Advertisement
A fighter jet squadron flies over during the National Anthem before Texas A&M’s game against Arkansas at Olsen Field on Saturday, May 18, 2024. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
Bryan-College Station Regional participants announced
Ian Curtis, Sports Writer • May 27, 2024

For the second time in three seasons, No. 3 national seed Texas A&M baseball will host the Bryan-College Station Regional, where it’ll...

Advertisement
Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
Advertisement
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Aggies sip coffee and history

On Wednesday mornings, the Glasscock center presents “Morning Coffee Hour,” an informal discussion centered around current research by professors in the history department.
This week, Professor Angela Pulley Hudson led a discussion over her most recent book, “Creek Paths and Federal Roads: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves and the Making of the American South.”
In addition to an abundance of coffee and pastries, conversation flowed from all who were present.
Those in attendance included noted faculty members such as the director of the Glasscock Center for Humanities Research James Rosenheim, associate professor in the department of history, Andrew Kirkendall and doctoral student Brian Franklin.
“Morning Coffee Hour is a very informal place,” Franklin said. “It’s a good opportunity to learn about a subject you wouldn’t normally seek out on your own. People from all other disciplines who are interested in learning attend.”
Conversation centered on Hudson’s work of unearthing the reality faced by Native Americans in the 19th century.
“I hope students will learn that Indian people were dispossessed of their homelands in nearly every region that now comprises the United States of America, including Texas, the South and much of the West. And I hope they will understand that this process did not take place overnight and was not inevitable,” Hudson said.
American Indian history is not a well-known subject. Although indigenous Americans played a pivotal role in the formation of today’s society, it is not an area widely studied. Hudson is changing that.
“American Indian history is American history. Every chapter of American history involves the participation and perspectives of American Indian people. Even the most seemingly American phenomena– like barbecue and football– are either directly traced to or owe their development to American Indians,” she said. “I hope those attending “Morning Coffee Hour” will understand that Native people in the U.S. South and elsewhere have always been actively engaged in defining and defending their homelands. I also hope they will see that the development of the U.S. South is about much, much more than just the emergence of antebellum plantations and civil war battles.”

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Battalion

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas A&M University - College Station. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Battalion

Comments (0)

All The Battalion Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *