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The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Texas A&M utility Gavin Grahovac (9) throws the ball during A&Ms game against Georgia on Friday, April 26, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
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Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
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Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
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Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Assault crimes go unreported

One in four women and one in six men will be sexually abused in their lifetime, said Laury Kasowaski, executive director for the Brazos County Rape Crisis Center.
“Sexual assault has been and will continue to be a problem in our community and our country until we as a community take a stand against this horrific crime,” Kasowaski said.
April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month – a month dedicated to educating people about sexual assaults, Kasowaski said.
“A majority of sexual assaults go unreported,” Kasowaski said. “The purpose of Sexual Assault Awareness Month is to let survivors of sexual assault know that the community supports them, and they are not alone.”
In 2005, the rape crisis center of Brazos County serviced 335 clients, received 2,736 hotline calls and provided 68 accompaniments to local hospitals for survivors in need of a sexual assault exam, Kasowaski said.
“Sexual assault is the most unreported crime in the United States,” Kasowaski said. “In fact, every two-and-a-half minutes another person in this country is sexually assaulted.”
High school and college students and the elderly are the most susceptible age groups to sexual assault due to a higher level of vulnerability, she said.
“Sexual assault can affect anyone of any age, gender or race,” Kasowaski said. “However, 2005 statistics state that, of the clients we saw last year, 41 percent of all females and 20 percent of males fell between the ages of 13 and 25.”
CSPD statistics showed that, from January to March, three accounts of rape were reported, an increase from last year’s reports during the same time period.
Kasowaski said she believes more aggressive action is needed in dealing with sexual assault, and society should make an effort to inform themselves about what they can do to prevent this crime.
One of the biggest problems with sexual assault is that people do not always report it, said Anna Van Buskirk, a senior sociology major and student worker with A&M’s Women and Gender Equity Resource Center.
“(The assaulter) tends to be someone close to the person, so they won’t come forward,” Van Buskirk said. “It hits all types of people. The hard part is actually getting people to talk about it.”
The University has resources available to students, Van Buskirk said.
“If women come to our office we can quickly get them in contact with someone who can counsel them,” Van Buskirk said. “We do a lot of educational programs to warn girls about signs of an abusive relationship and about how people can keep themselves safe.”
Although they can vary, there are warning signs to look for in sexual assault victims, Van Buskirk said.
“A big thing to look for is mood changes, changes in regular behavior patterns or if they aren’t doing as well in school (as they usually do),” Van Buskirk said. “Also look for marks on the person.”
If someone suspects a friend might be part of an abusive relationship, show support, Van Buskirk said.
“Let the person know that you’re there for them, and try to make them aware of resources available to them,” she said.

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