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The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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Corps units help usher in new state leaders

Photos by Shelby Knowles — THE BATTALION
Gov. Greg Abbott waves to the crowd during the inaugural parade Tuesday. (Below) The Ross Volunteers march at the Capitol. 
Photos by Shelby Knowles — THE BATTALION Gov. Greg Abbott waves to the crowd during the inaugural parade Tuesday. (Below) The Ross Volunteers march at the Capitol. 

The south lawn of the Texas Capitol buzzed Tuesday afternoon with an estimated crowd of 17,000. Excited chatter and hopeful spirits filled the air while performances from the Texas Longhorn band and the Providence Catholic School choir hyped up the grand Oath of Office ceremony. A hush fell across the crowd as Gov. Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick were sworn into office. Some smiled through tears of joy and pride.
“I am living proof that we live in a state where a young man’s life can literally be broken in half and yet he can still rise up and be governor of this great state,” Abbott said in his inauguration speech that highlighted the promise of allowing motivated Texans access to endless opportunities, no matter their background or condition. Abbott is paralyzed from the waist down and relies on a wheelchair for mobility.
Abbott also emphasized campaign promises and his determination to fight the federal policies being appointed in Washington if necessary.
“I will continue my legacy of pushing back against Washington if they spend too much, regulate too much or violate our state sovereignty,” the new governor said.
Agribusiness senior Jordan Garcia was just 8 years old when Rick Perry was elected governor of Texas. Today he got to be a part of ushering in his replacement in the Texas Aggie Band as it marched in the governor’s inaugural parade.
“[The Aggie Band] does a lot of performances throughout the year, but nothing as big as a governor’s inauguration,” Garcia said. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime kind of thing.”
Garcia said the band’s extensive practices during football season prepared them to perform at the parade.
The parade attracted visitors from all over Texas. Jennifer Hancock, Class of 1993, had traveled all the way to Austin to see her son represent Parson’s Mounted Cavalry in the parade.
“Seeing the Aggies take part in such a big event is really a great representation of Texas A&M,” Hancock said. “I came out to see my son and to be part of history.”
Along with the Aggie Band and Parson’s Mounted Cavalry, the Ross Volunteers also participated in the inauguration. The Ross Volunteers were chiefly tasked in providing a saber arch at the Oath of Office ceremony.
Agricultural science junior Garrett Hancock said being invited by the governor to march in the parade and represent Texas A&M was one of the best experiences he has had in college.
“Halfway through our march I started to get goosebumps,” Hancock said. “This parade was the first time A&M has had a citable presence in Austin since the last TU game.”
Hancock said his involvement was special in that participating in such an event has not happened since Perry’s first election.
“I think [Abbott] is going to do a really good job. He has good ideas and is determined,” Hancock said. “Texas is ready for a change.”

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  • Photos by Shelby Knowles — THE BATTALION Gov. Greg Abbott waves to the crowd during the inaugural parade Tuesday. (Below) The Ross Volunteers march at the Capitol. 

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