The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Sophomore LHP Shane Sdao (38) reacts after a strikeout during Texas A&Ms game against Texas at Disch-Falk Field on Tuesday, March 5, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
A Sunday salvage
May 12, 2024
Advertisement
The Northgate district right adjacent to the Texas A&M campus houses a street of bars and other restaurants.  
Programs look to combat drunk driving
Alexia Serrata, JOUR 203 contributor • May 10, 2024
Advertisement
Junior Mary Stoiana reacts during Texas A&M’s match against Oklahoma at the NCAA Women’s Tennis Regional at Mitchell Tennis Center on Sunday, May 5, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
No. 13 A&M upsets No. 5 Virginia in dominant fashion, 4-1
Roman Arteaga, Sports Writer • May 17, 2024

No. 13 Texas A&M women’s tennis met Virginia in the quarterfinal of the NCAA Tournament on Friday, May 17 at the Greenwood Tennis Center...

Advertisement
Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
Advertisement
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The Battalion May 4, 2024

Cyclist spreads Christian message through music

 
 

Expressions of belief such as those from fire-and-brimstone preachers promoting angry messages can lessen onlookers desires to pay attention. Sometimes all it takes to make an impact on the surrounding community is a man on a bicycle.
Jordan Chappell, sophomore sociology major, rides to and from class on a bicycle covered with various verses from the Psalms. While few may have seen his text-ridden bike, more have probably heard the Christian music blasting from a stereo in his backpack.
He said his reasons are simple. He wants to share the warmth he finds in Christian music.
God was really able to speak to me through music, ChappelI said. I feel like there was one song in particular that really got me hooked and if all it took was one song for me, there could be one song that really speaks to someone else. If it has the same effect on them, if they are able to see Jesus through the music, then thats what my main goal is.
Chappell said he hopes the music he plays will serve as a means of turning around a bad day.
Ive had several people tell me that they were having a bad day and they heard a song and it completely changed their day, he said. So, I know that thats not me, thats Jesus working through the music.
George Garcia, freshman Blinn Team student, was one such person affected by Chappells music.
I cant say much for the religious aspect of it, Garcia said. But when I heard the music playing, it definitely brought a smile to my face after a long morning at work.
Chappell said his expression of belief is a sort of obligation given the open environment on campus.
Why not talk about Jesus if you can talk about him? he said. So many people hide what they feel instead of expressing the way they feel. To live for Jesus, he wants you to live unashamed. Thats Romans 1:16, and to live unashamed, you have to be willing to share what you feel to the world. So, music is a great way to express how you feel.
Chappell said street corner preachers are often there for the wrong reasons, which could push people away from Christianity.
They get this mindset of a Christian [as] being this angry person who has a set of rules that you have to do in order to earn [Gods] grace, Chappell said. Nothing about [the relationship with God] is angry. The difference between that and the music that I play is that this [music] is all about grace and love and healing.
While Chappell partially attributes the acceptance of playing Christian music around campus to the prevalence of Christian groups on campus, John Choate, sophomore chemical engineering major, said the action is acceptable at least on the basis that it isnt bothering anyone studying inside classrooms.
We have clubs, organizations and a radio station that come all the time to play their music in academic plaza, so I feel he should have just as much of a right to express himself just as freely, Choate said.
Charles Hopkins, sophomore Blinn Team student, said Chappells actions are not simply acceptable, but his actions should be promoted in society.
Hes getting what ideas he wants out there in a way thats interesting and not offensive, Hopkins said. This is the kind of speech we should foster.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Battalion

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas A&M University - College Station. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Battalion

Comments (0)

All The Battalion Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *