The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Advertisement
The Northgate district right adjacent to the Texas A&M campus houses a street of bars and other restaurants.  
Programs look to combat drunk driving
Alexia Serrata, JOUR 203 contributor • May 10, 2024
Advertisement
Freshman Cayetana Fernández García-Poggio appears to put in the rain during the Bryan Regional of the NCAA Women’s Golf Championship at Traditions Golf Club on Monday, May 6, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
A&M’s season wraps up with 3-0 loss to UCLA in NCAA quarterfinals
Luke White, Sports Editor • May 21, 2024

The Texas A&M women’s golf team’s habit of struggling to close out matches led to the closing of its season on Tuesday, May 21, with...

Advertisement
Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
Advertisement
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Jimmy Eat World

It has been three years since Jimmy Eat World put its mark on the emo scene with its hit album “Bleed America” (the title was changed to “Jimmy Eat World” after 9/11). Although many bands shy away from being called “emo” and all the stereotypes of wire-rimmed, poetry-writing teenagers who go along with it, Jimmy Eat World carries the title without all the overkill (besides, none of the band’s members wear wire-rimmed glasses!).
Now back with a new set of emotionally charged, radio-ready songs, Jimmy Eat World’s new album, “Futures,” continues the band’s success by being deeper and more challenging. It comes close to succeeding, but do we really need another album of heart-broken teen-angst ballads? Jimmy Eat World would probably say yes, and anyone who likes an emotionally mature album would probably agree.
Though not instantly gratifying, on repeated listens, “Futures” is a good collection of rock songs. Jimmy Eat World has improved in many ways since its last album – it has increased political content, references to drug use and the length of its songs (one spanning a good seven-and-a-half minutes).
Most songs are radio-ready and catchy, always bursting with honesty. “Futures,” the title track, is immediate with honesty, sharing the band’s political view on the Bush administration. Adkins croons with hope “I always believed in futures/ I hope for better in November.”
The album continues with “Just Tonight … ,” a fast-paced track about changing relationships. Not the best track lyrically, Adkins sings, “I’d give you anything but you want pain/ a little water please/ I taste you on my teeth.” The guitar beat, however, is fun and loud, adding a heavier rock sound to the album.
The gem of this album is “Work,” a catchy song featuring backup vocals by Liz Phair. It’s too bad that you can barely hear Phair over the guitar riffs. The lyrics make up for this flaw. Though not as deep and brooding as other tracks, “Work” will replay in your head.
The album continues its catchy tunes with the single “Pain” and the addiction tale “Drugs or Me” that pulls on the heart with its sad lyrics and string arrangement. Though not the most upbeat song on the album, “Pain” shows a glimpse of hopefulness as Adkins croons, “I can’t let it bother me/ Takes my pain away.” “Drugs or Me,” however, is a different story. On this slow ballad, all Adkins offers is tears when he sings “You promise that you’re done/ But I can’t tell you from the drugs.”
Jimmy Eat World makes teen angst friendly on “Futures,” by adding much needed hope to the emo scene. By incorporating some songs that don’t induce tears and heartache, this soul-bearing album is very bearable and actually pretty good. Jimmy Eat World knows how to do emo and all of its stereotypes justice.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Battalion

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas A&M University - College Station. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Battalion

Comments (0)

All The Battalion Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *