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The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Texas A&M utility Gavin Grahovac (9) throws the ball during A&Ms game against Georgia on Friday, April 26, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Southern slugfest
May 23, 2024
Texas A&M pitcher Evan Aschenbeck (53) reacts after throwing the final strike out during Texas A&M’s game against Mississippi State on Saturday, March 23, 2024, at Olsen Field. (Chris Swann/ The Battalion)
Down but not out
May 23, 2024
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Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
Nicholas Gutteridge, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024
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A fighter jet squadron flies over during the National Anthem before Texas A&M’s game against Arkansas at Olsen Field on Saturday, May 18, 2024. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
Bryan-College Station Regional participants announced
Ian Curtis, Sports Writer • May 27, 2024

For the second time in three seasons, No. 3 national seed Texas A&M baseball will host the Bryan-College Station Regional, where it’ll...

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Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
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April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
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Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

New crop on the block

The+Texas+A%26amp%3BM+Agrilife+Research+and+Extension+Canter+at+Uvalde+is+looking+into+new+farming+techniques+to+increase+artichoke+production+in+Texas.
Provided

The Texas A&M Agrilife Research and Extension Canter at Uvalde is looking into new farming techniques to increase artichoke production in Texas.

Throughout Texas, artichokes are not a commonly produced crop. Texas A&M AgriLife is pushing to change that with new developments in farming techniques.
The Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Uvalde has been looking at several aspects of artichoke growth, from irrigation to nitrogen management in the soil, as well as seed quality to enhance germination. Researchers are developing and strengthening these techniques to produce more quality products, which could lead to higher consumer acceptance.
According to center director and professor of vegetable physiology Daniel Leskovar — who is leading these research efforts — making artichokes a more well-known product in Texas will boost the state economy.
“Artichoke is a crop that is not known in Texas and is grown almost exclusively in California,” Leskovar said. “Artichoke is a plant that can thrive in our environment. It’s a plant that can produce different types of products that can bring high economic returns to farmers.”
However, before Texas can reap the benefits of artichokes becoming a top commercial crop, growing techniques need to be thoroughly established.
Horticultural sciences system physiologist Vijay Joshi said without established methods, artichokes could not be made profitable.
“To make it commercialized or marketable, you need to standardize the growing parameters,” Joshi said. “You cannot just jump-start this production based on whatever producers have. If you want to have commercial production, you need to find out the specifics, and you need to standardize these different things one at a time before you can even think about commercial production.”
Media relations specialist Paul Schattenberg said newly developed growing strategies will benefit consumers and farmers alike.
“Development of year-round management strategies focused on producing artichoke heads in the spring and fall in areas of the state will give producers a positive market opportunity to sell their product at the best possible price,” Schattenberg said. “The researchers are hoping Texas retailers and consumers will see the advantage of buying locally produced artichoke heads. This would be of economic benefit to many Texas producers and help create a new product market to further enhance Texas agriculture.

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