The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Texas A&M Aggies guard Tyrece Radford (23) blocks Arkansas Razorbacks guard Tramon Mark (12) during Texas A&M’s game against Arkansas on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024, at Reed Arena. (Ishika Samant/The Battalion)
Free falling
February 20, 2024
Jace LaViolette (17) an Head Coach Jim Schlossnagle celebrating a home run during Texas A&Ms game against UIW on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024 at Olsen Field. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
GALLERY: Baseball vs. UIW
February 20, 2024
Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) catches a pop fly during Texas A&M’s game against McNeese on Sunday, Feb. 18, 2024 at Blue Bell Park. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
Four for four
February 20, 2024
Texas A&M Aggies guard Tyrece Radford (23) blocks Arkansas Razorbacks guard Tramon Mark (12) during Texas A&M’s game against Arkansas on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024, at Reed Arena. (Ishika Samant/The Battalion)
Free falling
February 20, 2024
Jace LaViolette (17) an Head Coach Jim Schlossnagle celebrating a home run during Texas A&Ms game against UIW on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024 at Olsen Field. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
GALLERY: Baseball vs. UIW
February 20, 2024
Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) catches a pop fly during Texas A&M’s game against McNeese on Sunday, Feb. 18, 2024 at Blue Bell Park. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
Four for four
February 20, 2024

Research week plumbs student innovations

 
 

Student researchers and research enthusiasts are coming together from labs and academic haunts scattered across A&M to highlight breakthroughs made this year by the student body.
More than 600 students will present and compete in a variety of research topics at the 16th annual Student Research Week, SRW. With its Tuesday kickoff, SRW runs all day in the MSC until Thursday, when several students will be awarded recognition for their work by a group of judges.
Held in the MSC ballroom and surrounding space, the program aims to recognize and celebrate student research at A&M by fostering an environment for students, faculty, and staff to learn about ongoing research conducted on campus.
Erica Gacasan, freshman biomedical engineering major and student volunteer for SRW, said bringing recognition to the work done on campus is important to all students, regardless of academic background.
A&M is an innovative campus, Gacasan said. There are groundbreaking things going on here. Its important to know what [is being researched] because eventually you will be faced by its implications.
This years theme is Where Curiosity Speaks. Inspired by Steve Jobs who once said, Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, everything else is secondary Student Research Week aims this year to provide every Aggie a chance to showcase his or her discoveries.
For Michelle Ramsey, A&M biology doctoral student, her curiosity led her to discover a new method for potentially understanding the way certain diseases are caused and thus how they can be prevented and cured.
A lot of cells [in the body] function based on their orientation toward the cells around them, said Ramsey. When these cell patterns are disrupted, it can cause things such as developmental disorders and polycystic kidneys.
Ramsey said her research focused on the way photoreceptors in the human eye are arranged, and how these cell patterns in the cornea show possible similarity to structures found elsewhere in the body. She said while it was well understood that their genetic pathways orient many types of cells, her breakthrough came because nobody had bothered to look for the same arrangements in photoreceptors before.
By understanding [the cell patterns], it gives us clues as to what can go wrong when they do not develop properly, Ramsey said. With this understanding, we are closer to solving health issues such as why cysts develop throughout the body, such as in the kidneys.
Students who are an academic degree above the competitor will judge research. In addition to student judges, there are several professional members of industry in attendance to view the student work.
Were always interested in the latest and greatest ideas, said Tony Ragucci, chief technology officer for the Lynntech Company and SRW judge. We see the value [in student research] and give an industrial perspective on the research showcased, especially on how it can be commercialized.
SRW will conclude Thursday evening with awards and a closing ceremony. Poster presentations will take place in the MSC ballroom, with topic-specific presentations taking place in the MSC rooms around it. The presentations are open to the public.

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