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The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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The Northgate district right adjacent to the Texas A&M campus houses a street of bars and other restaurants.  
Programs look to combat drunk driving
Alexia Serrata, JOUR 203 contributor • May 10, 2024
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The Aggies react after clinching the national championship after Texas A&M’s win against Georgia at the NCAA Women’s Tennis Championship Game in Greenwood Tennis Center in Stillwater, Oklahoma on Sunday, May 19, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Aggies ace it, Bulldogs face it
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 20, 2024

The No. 13 Texas A&M women's tennis team took on No. 7 Georgia and served up a score of 4-1 to clinch its newest title: NCAA Champions.  The...

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Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
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Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
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Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Evidence of adult neurogenesis, fossils and rediscovered bee: This Week in Science

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This Week in Science 4/4

When it comes to the world of science, researchers make discoveries and breakthroughs every day. To help you keep up with them, The Battalion has compiled a few of the most compelling scientific breakthroughs from the past week.
Neuroscience: New evidence in favor of neurogenesis  
It has previously been debated by scientists whether or not adult humans were capable of neurogenesis. Neurogenesis is the process of creating new neurons, which are the cells of the nervous system. This process is observed in all animals during their development, except for a few such as sponges, but upon reaching adulthood not all species continue to produce new neurons.
While viewing slices of 13 postmortem brains from previously healthy adults, researchers found potential evidence of thousands of newly formed cells in the hippocampus. In contrast, the brains of 45 individuals who had suffered from Alzheimer’s disease showed less of these cells. This suggests that the disease may be connected to neurogenesis and may offer new information in the fight against the disease.
Paleontology: Fossils show immediate aftermath of dinosaur extinction
In southwestern North Dakota, the newly dubbed Tanis site shows the immediate aftermath of impact of the dinosaur-killing asteroid. The site is found around 3,000 kilometers away from the impact zone of the asteroid, and shows evidence of river water sloshing violently after the asteroid spawned a magnitude ten, or greater, earthquake. This lead to the quick burial of the river life found at the time. The fossils of those organisms, such as fish, were found in a meter-thick layer of rock, alongside traces of the impact.
The asteroid hit Earth 66 million years ago, marking the end of non-avian dinosaurs along with many other species. The dig site goes against the thought that many species were already dying out before the impact, as some have been hypothesizing. So while many questions still surround the event, this find helps the argument that the asteroid was the leading factor of the extinction.
Biology: Rediscovery of lost bee species
A group of four scientists set out into the forests of Indonesia bee hunting in January and came out finding the long-lost Wallace’s giant bee. The bee species, which had been missing for around 38 years, measures around 4 centimeters and a wingspan around 7.5 centimeters. However, Wallace’s giant bee is only one of 25 species looking to be rediscovered.
With the help of 100 scientists, the Global Wildlife Conservation compiled a list of 1,200 species that have been missing in recent years. Of these, 25 have been named “most wanted,” with Wallace’s giant bee being one of them. The rediscovery of the bee is a beacon of hope in the look of the other species that have been lost to science.

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