The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
Nicholas Gutteridge, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024
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Texas A&M infielder Trinity Cannon (6) reacts during Texas A&M’s game against Texas at the Austin Super Regional at Red and Charline McCombs Field in Austin, Texas, on Friday, May 24, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Aggies a win away from Women’s College World Series after 6-5 win over Longhorns
Luke White, Sports Editor • May 24, 2024

Texas A&M softball experienced every inch of the pendulum of emotions in its NCAA Super Regional matchup with Texas on Friday, May 24, but...

Texas A&M utility Gavin Grahovac (9) throws the ball during A&Ms game against Georgia on Friday, April 26, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Southern slugfest
May 23, 2024
Texas A&M pitcher Evan Aschenbeck (53) reacts after throwing the final strike out during Texas A&M’s game against Mississippi State on Saturday, March 23, 2024, at Olsen Field. (Chris Swann/ The Battalion)
Down but not out
May 23, 2024
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Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
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Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Nuclear costs, grade gender gap and opioid danger: This Week in Science

Opioid+Deaths+US
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Opioid Deaths US

Projected Costs of Nuclear Forces for 2019 to 2028 is higher than past estimates

The Congressional Budget Office released their biennial study on the cost of America’s nuclear arsenal. The CBO estimates that the total 10-year cost is about $494 billion — $94 billion more than the 2017 to 2026 cost estimates. Part of the increase is due to the ongoing nuclear modernization program.

 

The oceans are heating up 40 percent faster than scientists realized

A new perspective article published in “Science” says oceans are heating up 40 percent faster than estimates examined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for their 2013 assessment report. Even though popular media portrays average global atmospheric temperatures as the measure of global warming, most of the global thermal energy is stored in the oceans. Higher than expected ocean heat content may indicate that greenhouse gases are changing the climate faster than scientists have currently projected.

 

Asian-American boys match the grades of Asian-American girls in elementary school

A large body of evidence shows that girls on average outperform boys in school as early as kindergarten. A new study published in the journal “Sociological Science” finds that Asian-American boys perform as well as Asian-American girls in elementary school, but a gender achievement gap develops and grows in later years, starting around middle school. This male underperformance appears to be linked to social influences such as school environments and peer relations.

 

Americans are more likely to die of an opioid overdose than in a vehicle crash
A new report by the National Safety Council found that for the first time in US history, the probability of dying of a opioid overdose is greater than the chances of dying in a car crash. Heart disease and cancer still lead as the leading causes of death among Americans.

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