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The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
Nicholas Gutteridge, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024
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Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) robs a home run from Florida infielder Cade Kurland (4) in the top of the ninth inning during Texas A&M’s game against Florida at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at Charles Schwab Field in Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, June 15, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
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Ian Curtis, Sports Reporter • June 16, 2024

Texas A&M baseball sophomore RF Jace LaViolette is known for his bat — and for good reason. LaViolette ranks sixth in the country in home...

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The Fighting Texas Aggie Band performs at halftime during Texas A&Ms football game against ULM at Kyle Field on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2023.
Gridiron glory to multi-event marvel
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • June 7, 2024

Special teams: Special events  “My favorite thing about an event is seeing the people come into the stadium and seeing their excitement...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
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April 25, 2024
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Chris Hemsworth as Dementus in Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga.
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Justin ChenJune 4, 2024

My jaw dropped open in 2016. Rarely in life does that happen, but the viewing experience of “Mad Max: Fury Road" was something to behold....

Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) robs a home run from Florida infielder Cade Kurland (4) in the top of the ninth inning during Texas A&M’s game against Florida at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at Charles Schwab Field in Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, June 15, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
Saves and a robbery
June 16, 2024

This week in science

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Photo by Creative Commons
This Week in Science

When it comes to the world of science, discoveries and breakthroughs are made every day. To help you keep up with them, The Battalion compiles a few of the most compelling scientific stories from this past week.
Biology: New self-healing electronic “skin” gives amputees a sense of temperature and pressure on prosthetic limbs
New research from the University of Colorado Boulder shows advancements in prosthetic limbs by developing new electric skin, known as “e-skin” for short. The new skin has the ability to sense pressure, which is a important factor to improving prosthetic limbs.
When a limb is wrapped in the e-skin, it can sense when it’s holding something light and delicate like a glass cup. This can save mechanical hands from accidentally crushing something when in use. The newly developed skin can also be used to sense temperature, which gives prosthetic users a chance to sense things like fevers and sickness.
The newly researched skin is created by a network of polyimine and silver nanoparticles, which provide strength and electrical conductivity. The material is recyclable and can heal itself just by mixing the compounds found in ethanol.
Environment: 15 million gallons of mercury could be under the ocean in permafrost
A new study published in the Geophysical Research Letters journal found over 15 million gallons of mercury could be in permafrost in the Northern Hemisphere. This is over twice the amount of mercury that can be found in the remainder of Earth’s soils, ocean and atmosphere.
Permafrost is any given soil that is frozen for more than two years and accounts for 8.8 million square miles of land in Northern Hemisphere. The study had researchers drill 13 permafrost soil cores from various sites between 2004 and 2012. From there, the total amount of mercury and carbon was taken. By estimating the amount of mercury in each sample, the total amount was estimated to be 15 million gallons.
Permafrost thawing has already occured due to climate change and the Northern Hemisphere could lose 30 to 99 percent of its permafrost by the year 2100, according to a 2013 study. If the permafrost is thawed and mercury is released, the researchers said it could seep into water and transform into methylmercury, a toxin that can cause motor impairment and birth defects in animals. The researchers are working on a follow up that is modeling the release of permafrost due to climate change.
Animal Science: World’s tiniest 3-D glasses reveal how praying mantises see the world
Praying mantises are the only invertebrates known to see in 3-D, but their depth perception only works when the prey they are targeting is moving. In a new study, scientists glued the world’s tiniest 3-D glasses on 20 praying mantises to examine exactly how the insect preys on its victims.
With the 3-D glasses on, scientists showed the mantises a series of movies showing patches of moving dots that can be seen as potential “prey items” camouflaged against a matching background. With the “prey” appearing within 2.5 centimeters, the insects tried to capture the dot configuration.
Humans see in 3-D by using both eyes to bring the images together. The mantis’ is different, only bringing images together when motion occurs. This method of sight is the first of its kind to be found in nature.

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