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The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Texas A&M utility Gavin Grahovac (9) throws the ball during A&Ms game against Georgia on Friday, April 26, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Southern slugfest
May 23, 2024
Texas A&M pitcher Evan Aschenbeck (53) reacts after throwing the final strike out during Texas A&M’s game against Mississippi State on Saturday, March 23, 2024, at Olsen Field. (Chris Swann/ The Battalion)
Down but not out
May 23, 2024
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Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
Nicholas Gutteridge, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024
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A fighter jet squadron flies over during the National Anthem before Texas A&M’s game against Arkansas at Olsen Field on Saturday, May 18, 2024. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
Bryan-College Station Regional participants announced
Ian Curtis, Sports Writer • May 27, 2024

For the second time in three seasons, No. 3 national seed Texas A&M baseball will host the Bryan-College Station Regional, where it’ll...

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Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
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April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
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Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Spire chosen for Ground Zero

A spire that would rise hundreds of feet higher than the World Trade Center was chosen Thursday to fill the yawning hole in the city’s skyline, opening a complex new phase in the rebuilding of ground zero.
The plan by architect Daniel Libeskind will restore “lower Manhattan to its rightful place in the world,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg said.
The design calls for a cluster of glassy, angled buildings and a 1,776-foot spire filled with gardens instead of office space. It would preserve part of the pit that was the foundation of the twin towers for an as-yet undesigned memorial to the nearly 2,800 people who died there Sept. 11.
“The plan succeeds both when it rises into the sky and when it descends into the ground. In doing so, it captures the soaring optimism of our city and honors the eternal spirit of our fallen heroes,” said John Whitehead, chairman of the Lower Manhattan Development Corp., the agency that picked the design.
Libeskind’s design was chosen over the THINK team’s 1,665-foot latticework towers, which echoed the trade center in design and shape.
Libeskind’s spire, at 1,776 feet, is meant to evoke the year of America’s independence. It would rise far above Malaysia’s 1,483-foot Petronas Twin Towers, the tallest building in the world. The trade center towers were 1,350 feet tall.
Officials praised Libeskind for trying to create a bustling, vibrant streetscape around the site, complete with a five-star hotel, a transportation hub, a memorial museum and a sky-high restaurant that recalls the trade center’s Windows on the World.
It also includes a space designed to capture a wedge of sunlight each year on Sept. 11, from the moment the first plane hit until the time the last tower fell.
Despite enthusiasm for the design, questions remain about almost everything else surrounding the project, including how Libeskind’s design will be paid for. A separate design competition for the memorial is scheduled to begin this spring, but how it will be funded is uncertain.
The insurance held on the trade center complex by developer Larry Silverstein is expected to help finance redevelopment, but he said earlier this month he was not satisfied with either plan. He did not speak at Thursday’s ceremony, though a spokesman said Silverstein “eagerly looks forward to working closely with Studio Daniel Libeskind on developing their site plan.”
There is also the question of who takes the lead now. The development corporation was created to oversee the rebuilding, but the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey owns the site and Silverstein holds the lease.
“That’s a question we’ve been asking both the governor and the mayor. You’ve got to give us direction here,” said Roland Betts, who heads the development corporation’s site planning committee.
Anthony Gardner, who lost his brother in the attack, criticized the decision to raise the floor of ground zero from 70 feet to 30 feet. “The site is a hallowed battleground, and it needs to be treated with reverence,” he said.
The 57-year-old Libeskind, who grew up in the Bronx, said that decision was made to stabilize the immense slurry walls holding back the Hudson River that were laid bare when the towers collapsed.
Libeskind likened the walls’ strength to the strength of democracy.
“Truly a wall of freedom,” he said. “Freedom really etched in this wall.”
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On the Net:
LMDC: http://www.renewnyc.org
Port Authority: http://www.panynj.gov

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