The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Advertisement
The Northgate district right adjacent to the Texas A&M campus houses a street of bars and other restaurants.  
Programs look to combat drunk driving
Alexia Serrata, JOUR 203 contributor • May 10, 2024
Advertisement
The Aggies react after clinching the national championship after Texas A&M’s win against Georgia at the NCAA Women’s Tennis Championship Game in Greenwood Tennis Center in Stillwater, Oklahoma on Sunday, May 19, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Aggies ace it, Bulldogs face it
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 20, 2024

The No. 13 Texas A&M women's tennis team took on No. 7 Georgia and served up a score of 4-1 to clinch its newest title: NCAA Champions.  The...

Advertisement
Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
Advertisement
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Student Health Services improving Beutel facility

 
 

Student Health Services are making changes to improve access and appointment availability at A.P. Beutel Health Center.
A new ramp, steps and automatic doors along with the ability to check appointment times online are some changes that have already been implemented at the center.
Russell Klinkenberg, senior associate director for Student Health Services, said the improvements were necessary to accommodate the increased student population.
“The center was built to service 18,000 students,” he said. “Now there are about 45,000 students to serve.”
Klinkenberg said the online clinic availability checking system is a wonderful new tool for students.
“It’s so easy for students to log in and check to see what times are available and convenient for them,” he said.
Students can check for clinic availability by going to the Student Health Services Web site (http://shs.tamu.edu). Students must then call the health center appointment line to reserve a particular appointment time.
“The system runs in real time as long as there is interaction on the Web site,” Klinkenberg said.
Online appointment reservations, he said, will be available in about six months to a year.
The health services fee at A&M is $55 a semester, which entitles students to unlimited clinic visits.
Klinkenberg said the fee is the second lowest among the Big 12 schools behind Oklahoma and Oklahoma State, which charge students $54 a semester.
Scott Draper, assistant director for Student Health Services, said it’s beneficial for students to use the health center.
“If you visit your family physician, there is an insurance co-pay,” Draper said. “Here there’s no co-pay.”
Beyond clinic visits, students are responsible for paying for X-rays, lab tests, physical therapy and prescriptions from the pharmacy.
Draper said a lot of the costs may be covered by student’s personal health insurance.
“We give students the equivalent of a billing form to turn in to their insurance provider,” he said.
The services that the center charges extra for, Draper said, are equal to or below what other health care providers charge.
“You are not required to use our services, but shop around,” he said.Klinkenberg said they don’t want to replace a student’s family physician.
“We just want to be a viable, convenient choice for students,” he said.
Another change at Beutel is the addition of a pharmacy at the front entrance.
Jyane Pearson, chief pharmacist at Beutel, said she hopes the new pharmacy will be open by mid-March.
“It’ll be nice to get out of the basement,” she said.
The new pharmacy will be large enough to store all the drugs and useful documents they need in one area, Pearson said.
“The main benefit of the new pharmacy is increased visibility and accessibility for students,” she said.
Klinkenberg said besides primary health care, that Student Health Services’ main focus is to educate students about health care issues.
“We are an introduction to self-education,” he said. “We want to prepare students for health care beyond us.”
Klinkenberg said the lines at the front door of Beutel have been eliminated because they are trying to address privacy concerns of patients and become a more appointment-based clinic.
Eventually, he said, there will be an information desk up front that will direct patients to the right area of the clinic.
Draper said they are trying to encourage students to become educated about health concerns and to use the health center for that reason.
“You are going to see us out there changing our image,” Draper said.
“Overall, we hope that students look to us for their

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Battalion

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas A&M University - College Station. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Battalion

Comments (0)

All The Battalion Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *