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The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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The Northgate district right adjacent to the Texas A&M campus houses a street of bars and other restaurants.  
Programs look to combat drunk driving
Alexia Serrata, JOUR 203 contributor • May 10, 2024
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The Aggies react after clinching the national championship after Texas A&M’s win against Georgia at the NCAA Women’s Tennis Championship Game in Greenwood Tennis Center in Stillwater, Oklahoma on Sunday, May 19, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Aggies ace it, Bulldogs face it
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 20, 2024

The No. 13 Texas A&M women's tennis team took on No. 7 Georgia and served up a score of 4-1 to clinch its newest title: NCAA Champions.  The...

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Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
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Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Telling tales: Area writers share secrets of creativity

Despite some professors’ penchants for preaching old literature as the paragon of literary importance and poignancy, there are other options available in contemporary fiction. In many ways, Chaucer is dead, and a new kind of fiction is on its way as Aggie students and alumni leave their marks, one page at a time.
James Bowser, a senior english major, started writing comics at age 10.
“I initially started writing comic books because I loved to read them so much,” Bowser said. “I liked to read Spider Man, Daredevil and the Silver Surfer. I quickly created my own characters, then scripted a storyline.”
Bowser quickly compiled a collection of short stories dealing with specialized, undercover crime fighters, he said. Bowser’s story collection was complete by age 12. At this time, he began listening to darker music and focusing on the lyrics.
“I listened to a lot of … stereotypically portrayed … `kill, kill, kill’ music,” Bowser said. “I found that these lyrics were truly imaginative and creative. This is when I began writing horror.”
Bowser said his motives and messages differ from book to book.
His current work deals with “personal hangups, fears and self-loathing beliefs … that prevent [people] from discovering their true destiny in life,” Bowser said. “I want people to see that self-image is important in discovering who you are and where you are going.”
Bowser sees himself being a teacher and writer after graduation and said graduate school is a possibility. Bower’s most recent, yet unpublished, book, The Foreboding, is about a black football player at a predominantly white high school who has scholarship opportunities coming from every direction. Branded an “Uncle Tom” growing up, life has never been easy. An ACL injury before the playoffs during his senior year causes major colleges to drop offers. Only one small, historically black university from Texas still wants him. When he accepts the offer, the story picks up pace and an evil unfolds, Bowser said.
Dr. Gideon Adjei, Class of 1975, has written a book to be released in late October, Darker Shades of Light. His book has been optioned for a movie by Hollywood Zeus, Steven Spielberg.
The publishing process was not easy for Adjei.
“It’s a very competitive field,” Adjei said. “There are several people who have written or are currently writing.”
While researching in the library about publishing procedure, he decided he personally would publish his book.
“I spent about the last seven months just promoting the book,” Adjei said.
Adjei said his book is about acceptance and that he wrote to touch people.
“I feel like I can help people because of my many life experiences,” Adjei said.
Such experiences include traveling to several countries and spending time with people in crisis. He was on location to clean up the oil spill after the Gulf War. Seeing people in dire circumstance allowed Adjei to grip the rainbow of human emotions.
It took Adjei five months to complete Darker Shades of Light.
“Most of it was written in the middle of the night, at two o’clock in the morning,” Adjei said. “During my career, I learned that we can survive on small amounts of sleep.”
Adjei stands out as an example for writers who feel they do not have the tools or means to be published, and getting Spielberg to purchase his story is a pinnacle achievement.
Adjei admits that the task of writing a book is difficult, but realizes the ultimate product is its own reward.
Another Aggie writer, a junior history major who goes by the pen name Nolan, offers a fierce insight into writing.
“I’ve written a book, and the book is relentless,” Nolan said. “The book does not stop or yield for sensitive readers. It deals with imperative issues and inner depravity. My book will shut shit down.”
He refers to his book as rude, unsavory and unholy.
“There are no battles in this world except for the ones we have in our minds,” Nolan said. “I have taken the darkest part of the human psyche and bundled it up within the comforting pages of a book, but the book itself offers no comfort.”
The storyline is a first-person narrative told by a pedophile who kidnaps children and sells their bodies on the black market.
“The main character is sick,” Nolan said. “He has no humanity and no redeeming qualities. [People like him] exist in our society, but I’m the only person willing to admit it — and exploit it.”
His book is tentatively titled Anathema and is currently unpublished. He says he will be editing for a couple more months and then he will pursue publishers.
Nolan said finding a publisher to print his book will be difficult.
Nolan admits that this book alienates itself from an audience.
“Part of it is pushing boundaries, I want to explore unknown territories,” Nolan said. “This book is not user-friendly.”

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