The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Advertisement
The Northgate district right adjacent to the Texas A&M campus houses a street of bars and other restaurants.  
Programs look to combat drunk driving
Alexia Serrata, JOUR 203 contributor • May 10, 2024
Advertisement
The Aggies react after clinching the national championship after Texas A&M’s win against Georgia at the NCAA Women’s Tennis Championship Game in Greenwood Tennis Center in Stillwater, Oklahoma on Sunday, May 19, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Aggies ace it, Bulldogs face it
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 20, 2024

The No. 13 Texas A&M women's tennis team took on No. 7 Georgia and served up a score of 4-1 to clinch its newest title: NCAA Champions.  The...

Advertisement
Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
Advertisement
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Whoopstock brings diversity to A&M

Students and families walking in front of Kyle Field Saturday encountered cultural displays along with ethnic foods and entertainment. Twenty-four organizations, most of them culturally based, participated in the 14th annual Whoopstock Unity Festival.
From empanadas and non-alcoholic pi-a coladas, to face painting and bingo, the organizations used different means to teach about themselves.
During the festival, members of the Indonesian Student Association played the “Aggie War Hymn” on traditional instruments.
Geraldine Sumolang, a sophomore civil engineering major from Java, said they played the angklung – an instrument made of bamboo and played by shaking it. It took members about one month to learn to play the hymn, which they also played at International Week in early March, Sumolang said.
Antonia Yoyada, a junior electrical engineering major from Sumatra, said playing the “Aggie War Hymn” provided an inviting way for people to learn about Indonesian culture.
“People might be interested with more traditional stuff,” she said. “But the ‘Aggie War Hymn’ everyone knows.”
The festival began in 1993 in response to a proposed Ku Klux Klan march in College Station, said Meagan Pitcher, the director of Whoopstock. The student body decided to hold the alternative event rather than protest, she said.
“It was basically just to show that A&M was united and that College Station was not a welcoming environment for the KKK rally,” Pitcher said.
The plan was successful. Pitcher said about 400 people attended the first Whoopstock Unity Festival and that about three people attended the KKK march.
“Usually when they (the KKK) hold that kind of stuff, they want to get attention,” she said. “But they didn’t have an audience.”
Whoopstock – previously located on Simpson Drill Field – has grown since it moved to the Aggie Fan Zone, Pitcher said.
“It’s basically just showing that A&M is made up of a lot of types of people and we’re a united and diversified campus,” Pitcher said.
In addition to booths, Whoopstock, Jr. provided children with activities from a football toss and hockey shoot, to henna tattoos and name translations.
Roxanne Longoria, president of the Hispanic President’s Council, which represents the 18 Hispanic organizations on campus, said the festival allows A&M to showcase its diversity on a weekend when many prospective students and Aggie families are present.
“(We’re) reaching out to more students and spreading diversity because it’s Parents’ Weekend,” she said. “So you’re pretty much showing the campus that there is diversity, and that there are a lot of minority organizations that people can get involved in.”

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Battalion

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas A&M University - College Station. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Battalion

Comments (0)

All The Battalion Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *