The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Advertisement
Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
Nicholas Gutteridge, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024
Advertisement
Texas A&M infielder Trinity Cannon (6) reacts during Texas A&M’s game against Texas at the Austin Super Regional at Red and Charline McCombs Field in Austin, Texas, on Friday, May 24, 2024. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Aggies a win away from Women’s College World Series after 6-5 win over Longhorns
Luke White, Sports Editor • May 24, 2024

Texas A&M softball experienced every inch of the pendulum of emotions in its NCAA Super Regional matchup with Texas on Friday, May 24, but...

Texas A&M utility Gavin Grahovac (9) throws the ball during A&Ms game against Georgia on Friday, April 26, 2024, at Olsen Field. (CJ Smith/The Battalion)
Southern slugfest
May 23, 2024
Texas A&M pitcher Evan Aschenbeck (53) reacts after throwing the final strike out during Texas A&M’s game against Mississippi State on Saturday, March 23, 2024, at Olsen Field. (Chris Swann/ The Battalion)
Down but not out
May 23, 2024
Advertisement
Beekeeper Shelby Dittman scoops bees back into their hive during a visit on Friday, April 5, 2024. (Kyle Heise/The Battalion)
Bee-hind the scenes
Shalina Sabih, Sports Writer • May 1, 2024

The speakers turn on. Static clicks. And a voice reads “Your starting lineup for the Texas A&M Aggies is …” Spectators hear that...

Kennedy White, 19, sits for a portrait in the sweats she wore the night of her alleged assault inside the Y.M.C.A building that holds Texas A&M’s Title IX offices in College Station, Texas on Feb. 16, 2024 (Ishika Samant/The Battalion).
'I was terrified'
April 25, 2024
Scenes from 74
Scenes from '74
April 25, 2024
Advertisement
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

Wrongful accusations

As he shook his head in disgust for the majority of President George W. Bush’s State of the Union address, Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass., once again demonstrated his distaste for conservative policy in his typical immature manner. The recent recipient of the George Bush Public Service Award has done great deeds as a senator and public servant, but a recent comment made regarding the Bush administration’s involvement in Iraq tops off and summarizes Kennedy’s longstanding and mindless Bush-bashing streak of comments.
In a speech on Jan. 14, Kennedy said the war in Iraq was a political product invented by the Bush Administration to win elections, according to The Boston Herald. In the past, Kennedy has made other claims regarding the war, deeming it nothing short of unjust and fraudulent.
A man of such prestigious and significant responsibility has more important jobs to do, but he remains intent on exploiting the Iraq war to bring down the GOP, often basing his claims on invalid or ridiculous arguments.
One can reasonably argue that the war was miscalculated. It can even be charged that the decision was made with disregard for certain just-war criteria. But claiming that the war was a political move is outlandish. It would be illogical for Bush to risk an 80 percent approval rating by going to war to make his party look good.
In contrast, Bush foresightedly set aside his political popularity to make one of the most important decisions in American history.
The president repeatedly mentioned that post-9-11 America is a different scenario – one that many liberal politicians have failed to recognize. Bush was sincere and passionate about envisioning a more secure world. It cannot be said that the world is a worse place with the liberation of millions of Iraqis and the capture of one of the most infamous and brutal dictators in history.
There was no guarantee of capturing Saddam Hussein or finding weapons of mass destruction, but Bush disregarded his approval ratings to do what he thought necessary to improve the well-being of a nation and a world. Why would a president confronted with the inevitability of civilian casualties and the possibility of chemical and biological attack on his own troops take that path to boost his political ratings?
Kennedy is renowned for his candor when critiquing Bush. And, in most circumstances, a politician should be credited for speaking his or her mind when it comes to political matters. After all, one significant virtue of a democracy is allowing multiple ideologies to compete against each other to win over public opinion.
In addition, this continuing competition allows for the evolution of a necessary system of checks and balances between the parties. But there is a difference between a political mind keeping another in check and one set out to annihilate the other. Sen. Kennedy represents the latter.
Aside from Kennedy’s inadequately supported arguments, what should be considered most important is that Kennedy’s contribution to America in a time of conflict here and abroad is nonexistent. The country needs skeptics to monitor and critique the government, but only in a decent and mature manner. Kennedy and other politicians who claim that going to war was a mistake must avoid using the situation as only a political weapon.
As the presidential election day nears, both parties will inevitably continue to pummel the other. But as American troops continue to risk their lives everyday in the face on ongoing violent attacks, even the most fanatical of liberal politicians must refrain from declaring their efforts as products of some fictional and politically ambitious leader. The number of coalition lives that are lost grows every day, and, as America has its hands full and tries to make progress in the Middle East, it needs politicians who are more interested in the unity of a country than partisanship.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Battalion

Your donation will support the student journalists of Texas A&M University - College Station. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Battalion

Comments (0)

All The Battalion Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *