The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

Junior P Emily Kennedy (11) winds up to pitch during Texas A&Ms game against Kentucky on April 7th, 2024 at Davis Diamond. (Jaime Rowe/The Battalion)
Took the Tide
April 15, 2024
Junior P Emily Kennedy (11) winds up to pitch during Texas A&Ms game against Kentucky on April 7th, 2024 at Davis Diamond. (Jaime Rowe/The Battalion)
Took the Tide
April 15, 2024
Junior G Wade Taylor IV (4) covers his face after a missed point during Texas A&Ms game against Arkansas on Feb. 20, 2024 at Reed Arena. (Jaime Rowe/The Battalion)
When it rains, it pours
February 24, 2024
Ali Camarillo (2) waiting to see if he got the out during Texas A&Ms game against UIW on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2024 at Olsen Field. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
Four for four
February 20, 2024
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Dr. Weston Porter (top left) and researchers from the breast cancer lab. (Photo courtesy of Dr. Weston Porter)
New A&M research initiative provides cutting-edge cancer treatments
J.M. Wise, News Reporter • April 8, 2024

It has been 20 months since Michelle Pozzi, Ph.D, of Texas A&M’s Biochemistry and Biophysics department was diagnosed with cancer. However,...

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Junior P Emily Kennedy (11) winds up to pitch during Texas A&Ms game against Kentucky on April 7th, 2024 at Davis Diamond. (Jaime Rowe/The Battalion)
Took the Tide
Kylie Stoner, Associate Sports Editor • April 15, 2024

After a close pitching battle in the beginning of the matchup, Texas A&M softball defeated 9-4 Alabama to take the series on Monday, April...

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Visitors attend Homegrown at Northgate, an annual farmers and artisan market on Sunday, April 16, 2024. (Samuel Falade/The Battalion)
Homegrown brings food trucks, local vendors, live music to Northgate
Nadia Abusaid, Life & Arts Writer • April 15, 2024

A cool breeze flows on a Sunday as people listen to the strums of a guitar and smooth vocals. People stroll past stands and food trucks, stopping...

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Guest contributor says students pose an unacceptable danger to local motorists. (Photo via Nile/Pixabay)
Letter to the editor: No-More-Student-Drivers
Trey Bass, Guest Contributor • April 15, 2024

Dear Editor,  I am writing to discuss the current state of our city and some glaring issues I have noticed being perpetrated on the innocent...

Editorial: Rick Perry Building comes at too high a cost

The Board of Regents will consider adoption Thursday of a resolution to rename the Academic Building the Governor Rick Perry 72 Building.
The Board of Regents will consider adoption Thursday of a resolution to rename the Academic Building the Governor Rick Perry ’72 Building.

The Board of Regents chose not to seek student opinion before scheduling a Thursday meeting to consider honoring Gov. Rick Perry by renaming the Academic Building after him.
If they had, here’s a sampling of the voices they would have found in opposition: More than 330 comments on The Battalion‘s Facebook page, a rapid-fire Student Senate resolution and a petition with more than 7,000 signatures and counting. All this in less than two days during finals week, the busiest time of the year for many students.
More often than not, comments have mirrored this one: Perry might deserve campus recognition, but give him something — anything — other than the Academic Building.
Social media chatter rarely agrees on anything. But, overwhelmingly, students who have vocalized opinions online oppose the idea. It speaks volumes that a large portion of a campus ranked among the nation’s most conservative rejects naming the building after Perry — a conservative Aggie governor and former yell leader.
The absurdity of the idea goes well beyond the irony of putting Perry (and his well-documented sub-2.5 GPA) on A&M’s academic hub, which in 2014 celebrates its 100th birthday. The regents shouldn’t name the Academic Building after the governor. Not because he’s not qualified, but because no one is.
The building, built in 1914 for $200,000, has weathered generations of A&M history. It’s a centerpiece of campus lore. Countless have stood in its shadow in the cold, quiet dark to bear witness to fallen Aggies for Silver Taps.
An Aggie who sits in the governor’s seat for more than a decade deserves recognition. Perry is the most visible Aggie in the world not named Johnny Manziel. But some campus landmarks, such as the Academic Building and Memorial Student Center, are off limits.
The Board of Regents failed to recognize that in proposing the resolution. And if it’s passed, it will be testament to a board detached from the opinion and sentiment of the student body it claims to serve.
Campus has no place for the Governor Rick Perry ’72 Building — not at the cost of the Academic Building.

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