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The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
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Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
Farewell from the graduating Battalion staff of 2024
The BattalionMay 4, 2024

What it means to be an Aggie

Journalism+senior+Emma+Lawson+receives+her+Aggie+ring.%26%23160%3B
Provided by Emma Lawson

Journalism senior Emma Lawson receives her Aggie ring. 

Growing up in College Station, Aggie traditions felt like a part of my culture. Both my parents were Aggies, fell in love, my dad proposed under the Century Tree and their diplomas hang in our entryway like a badge of honor. There are old photos of me wearing a Texas A&M cheerleader’s gear and sitting by the Memorial Student Center fountain. In high school, I even sold corn dogs and lemon chills at Kyle Field during football games. With this experience, I can say Alabama fans are the worst, but I think we all knew that already.

So, when I got accepted into the University of Texas and A&M, I knew the right choice for me. 

I was able to enjoy one whole semester of normalcy and gain the “college experience.” I went to games, hung out with friends and studied my ass off for POLS 207 to just barely make a B. I was excited for the possibilities that the next semester would offer.

You may be surprised to learn that didn’t happen. Thanks, COVID-19. 

Moving out of Kruger Hall, my things stuffed into boxes, was one of the worst feelings I remember. It felt surreal, like moving out of a home. I celebrated my 19th birthday at home with a toilet paper cake made by a local bakery and tried my best to stay connected to friends. Fear creeped into the edge of my mind and I always wondered if I would truly experience Aggieland before graduating. 

Then, three days before I was supposed to move into Krueger Hall again as a sophomore, I was asked if I’d like to be a Resident Advisor at Dunn.
Then, as a junior, I was asked if I would like to join The Battalion on the Life & Arts Desk. 

Then, I joined an education abroad program and lived in Florence, Italy, for three weeks over the winter. 
Now, as a senior, I feel like I’ve really gotten a taste of what it means to be an Aggie, which I didn’t quite understand as an outsider looking in. It’s persisting together. Aggies like each other, more than alumni of other colleges might. We are a community that supports each other in the best way possible, and now that I’ve been wearing my Aggie Ring out, there are many Aggies who will stop me in the grocery store and ask about my college experience. 

To my mom and dad, thank you for your constant support. You’ve always been a shoulder to cry on and a reminder to pick myself up when things are hard and take it one step at a time. I love y’all to the moon and back.

To the friends I’ve made here on campus, I’ve been incredibly lucky to meet you. And to those who still have some time before they get their own bling, I am certain I’ll be leaving the campus in good hands. Break a leg! I know you’re going to do amazing things.

To my grandparents, I am beyond grateful for your support. Who else would drive their granddaughter every Wednesday to West Campus so she can make it to her class? I am blessed to have you in my life and I love you so much. And to the rest of my family, I wouldn’t be the person I am today without you. Thank you, truly. 

While my ring might symbolize 90 hours, it means so much more than that to me. It reminds me of the time I’ve spent with friends and family, of the opportunities we seized and the community that supports us at our darkest moments. 

Thanks and Gig ’em y’all!
 

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