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The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp attends the Class of 1972 50-year reunion in Kyle Field on April 20, 2022.
A&M System’s Title IX director suspended after supporting Biden's Title IX changes
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Texas A&M pitcher Ryan Prager (18) delivers a pitch during Texas A&M’s game against Kentucky at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at in Omaha, Nebraska on Monday, June 17, 2024. Prager went for 6.2 innings, allowing two hits and zero runs. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
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Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) robs a home run from Florida infielder Cade Kurland (4) in the top of the ninth inning during Texas A&M’s game against Florida at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at Charles Schwab Field in Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, June 15, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
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Texas A&M pitcher Ryan Prager (18) delivers a pitch during Texas A&M’s game against Kentucky at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at in Omaha, Nebraska on Monday, June 17, 2024. Prager went for 6.2 innings, allowing two hits and zero runs. (Chris Swann/The Battalion)
Sixth sense
June 18, 2024
Texas A&M outfielder Jace Laviolette (17) robs a home run from Florida infielder Cade Kurland (4) in the top of the ninth inning during Texas A&M’s game against Florida at the NCAA Men’s College World Series at Charles Schwab Field in Omaha, Nebraska on Sunday, June 15, 2024. (Hannah Harrison/The Battalion)
Saves and a robbery
June 16, 2024

A cultura to be proud of

Angel+Franco%26%23160%3B%28third+from+left%29+is+a+telecommunication+media+studies+senior+and+sports+editor+for+The+Battalion.
Photo by Cassie Stricker

Angel Franco (third from left) is a telecommunication media studies senior and sports editor for The Battalion.

am a proud second-generation Mexican-American, and believe it or not, at one point I didn’t want any part in being Mexican — mostly because I was being “forced” to learn a new language.
I can vividly remember being four years old and feeling angry when my mom told me I was going to learn Spanish. At the time, I didn’t understand why I had to learn a whole new language just so I could have a conversation with my grandmother.
What I didn’t realize was that it was a lot harder for my grandmother to learn English, and my mom wanting me to learn Spanish was her way of passing down her heritage to me.
My grandma Quezada has lived in the United States for 52 years, but not once has she let go of who she is.
She finds it important to pass on traditions to her kids and grandchildren and maybe one day great-grandchildren.
Until last semester, I never took a Spanish class in a formal setting. My classroom was my everyday home life, and my teachers were my mother, my grandmother and telenovelas.
As we would watch, I would ask my mom what each word meant in English and would practice pronouncing the words. As time went on, I became fluent.
Let me make this clear. Whether you’re fluent or not doesn’t make you more or less of a Latino. But in my own personal experience, I feel like being able to speak Spanish has made me more in tune with my cultural identity.
I love Hispanic Heritage Month because throughout these 30 days, my culture
is more visible to people who aren’t familiar with it. Most importantly, Hispanic Heritage Month highlights 
the incredibly talented Hispanic men and women who have made an impact in our society.
However, at the same time, I feel that it shouldn’t be simply a 30-day event; it should be every day.
When you grow up on the border, day-in and day-out, you see hard-working Hispanos making great discoveries, creating social change and just trying to make it through the day to get back to their families. To me, that should always be celebrated.
I am Hispanic and proud because of the amazing people before me. My Grandma Quezada has taught me valuable lessons of what it means to be Hispanic and how important it is to keep our cultura alive.
My Hispanic heritage is something that I’m proud about, and I don’t just celebrate once a year.

Angel Franco is a Telecommunication Media Studies senior and sports editor for The Battalion.
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