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The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

The Student News Site of Texas A&M University - College Station

The Battalion

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“Coraline” a light Halloween treat

Released+in+2009%2C+Coraline+is+based+on+the+2002+childrens+novella+by+Neil+Gaimen.
Photo by Creative Commons

Released in 2009, “Coraline” is based on the 2002 children’s novella by Neil Gaimen.

The creepy Halloween children’s movie “Coraline” is done entirely in stop motion. It tells the story of a young girl, Coraline, who moves with her family to an eerie, secluded house that is shared by a few other frightening characters. After crawling through a portal to a parallel world, Coraline finds herself fighting for her life against surreal creatures masquerading as friends.

The film is bizarre, especially for a kids’ movie, and relies heavily on creep factor, which it elicits through unsettling images of unnaturally shaped people with buttons for eyes. The first part of the film is based in a sense of childlike wonder, while the second part twists this into terror and confusion. 

The movie warns of things too good to be true and teaches the value of appreciating the world you live in. It’s a good message for children and one that is delivered artfully and effectively. 

The parallel world mirrors the real one, but everything seems a million times better. The cats talk, the neighbors are fun and friendly, the colors are bright and vibrant and it never seems to rain, despite the storm that persists in the real world. It’s a spectacle. It’s a dream — until it becomes a nightmare.

Stylistically, “Coraline” is absolutely brilliant. The stop-motion effects are so good and so true to the themes of the film. The Tim Burton-esque landscape alone is enough to keep you immersed in the story, and the horrifying fight against evil is really just icing on the cake. 

Because the film is done entirely in stop motion, there isn’t any traditional acting to mention. The voice-acting, however, was impeccable. Dakota Fanning was perfect as Coraline, and every supporting cast member became their character. Sometimes bad voice acting can distract from a performance, but all the characters of “Coraline” sounded perfect and ever so slightly sinister. Their performances didn’t distract from the film, but added to it. The real credit goes to the stop-motion technicians who bring life to the in-depth world in which the characters reside. The filmography is what makes the movie.

I would absolutely recommend seeing “Coraline.” It is a kids’ movie, but it’s still entertaining for adult audiences as well. Furthermore, it’s perfect preparation for Halloween season. The film is good, creepy and meaningful, but also light and fun. The stop-motion spectacle is beautiful to watch, and certain scenes will really make you laugh. It teaches about the value of family, and how some good things aren’t as good as they seem. 

MSC Aggie Cinema will screen “Coraline” on Friday, Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. in MSC 2406.

 

Keagan Miller is a psychology junior and Life & Arts reporter for The Battalion

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